Archives for September 2014

What is the Next Step for my Teen with Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a condition which is characterized by a consistent pattern of disruptive, violent or defiant behavior. Although the disorder generally presents before the age of 8, it can be undiagnosed or mistaken for another condition until the adolescent years. Without therapeutic intervention, ODD can cause extreme disruption to the family as well as the home and school environments. Some of the specific indicators of ODD are: 
  • Arguing
  • Refusal to comply with basic requests
  • Blaming others for mistakes and 
  • Easily annoyed and deliberately annoys others
  • Anger and resentment
While all children exhibit these behaviors at some point, those with ODD show a persistent pattern of four or more of the symptoms for a period of at least six months. Because Oppositional Defiant Disorder frequently co-exists with similar conditions, such as ADHD, children with suspected ODD should be evaluated by a qualified mental health professional. Although early therapeutic intervention is the most effective way to deal with ODD, it is never too late for parents to take steps to help their child overcome the disorder. 
 
What Do I Do With My Oppositional Defiant Disorder Teen? 
 
Teens with Oppositional Defiant Disorder can be extremely difficult to parent. Because their condition often causes them to feel wronged, they think they are entitled to lash out. When this results in violence or extreme aggression, parents and teachers may be intimidated into complying. Teens with ODD are very resistant to instruction or anything they feel is an attempt to control them.
 
Treating teens for ODD requires intensive efforts on the parent’s part, as their reactions and discipline style are crucial to the healing process. In addition to individual therapy, a mental health professional might recommend an exercise called Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). This involves covert coaching from a therapist watching a parent and child interact through a one way mirror. Through this exercise, parents learn more effective techniques for managing their child. Cognitive problem solving training in order to manage daily triggers and social skills training can also be valuable for a teen with ODD. In some cases where a teen is completely unresponsive to any attempt at therapy, it may be necessary to consider a therapeutic boarding school for teens with Oppositional Defiant Disorder.
 
If this is the case, your next step is to select a facility that is both safe and highly experienced in treating teens with ODD. For almost 15 years, Liahona Academy has specialized in helping teen boys with Oppositional Defiant Disorder gain the tools they need to overcome daily triggers, communicate more effectively and repair their important relationships. The immersive therapeutic environment at Liahona Academy allows troubled teens to have full time access to mental health professionals in a safe and supportive environment.
 
For a free consultation, contact us at Liahona Academy 1-800-675-8101.

Troubled Teens and Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a condition in which an individual exhibits a persistent pattern of angry, disruptive or defiant behavior toward authority figures. ODD generally appears before a child is 8, however, some remain undiagnosed or untreated until the adolescent years when the acting out becomes more harmful. Some of the specific indicators of ODD are: 
  • Arguing
  • Refusal to comply with basic requests 
  • Blaming others for mistakes
  • Easily annoyed and deliberately annoys others
  • Anger and resentment
  • Difficulty maintaining friendships
  • Violent reaction to frustration
Although many of these factors are present in every child at some point, those with ODD consistently exhibit four or more for at least six months. True Oppositional Defiant Disorder is disruptive to the child’s home and school environment and can be confused with other negative mood disorders. Parents who suspect their child may have ODD should have him assessed by a mental health professional for an official diagnosis. Because ODD is often seen in conjunction with other conditions, such as ADHD, parents must work closely with a therapist to make sure their teen’s plan of care addresses his specific needs. Early intervention is the most effective way to treat ODD, however, it is never too late for parents to get their child the help he needs. 
 
What Causes Oppositional Defiant Disorder?
 
The causes for Oppositional Defiant Disorder are still unclear, although researchers believe that it may be the result of a combination of inherited and environmental factors. Natural disposition and temperament, developmental delays, abuse or inconsistent discipline or a chemical imbalance in the brain have all been put forth as reasonable possibilities. As children with ODD become teens, the symptoms that define the disorder may become more difficult to treat. Because teens with ODD have a marked aversion to authority figures, parents and teachers are often the target of their aggression and anger. Teens with Oppositional Defiant Disorder often feel a sense of being wronged, which serves as an excuse to act out. 
 
Tips for Parents of Children with ODD
 
Treating teens for Oppositional Defiant Disorder can be tricky since the condition causes them to be resistant to anything they see as an effort to control them. Once you add the usual social and physical challenges most teens face during the adolescent years, it becomes even more difficult. Parental involvement is crucial if a teen is to overcome ODD and most mental health professionals recommend a regimen of individual and family therapy in order for both parties to learn how to effectively cope with the disorder. Although there is no medication specifically for the disorder, pharmaceuticals may help curb some of the side effects, such as anxiety, depression or insomnia. In more extreme cases, a therapeutic boarding school for teens with Oppositional Defiant Disorder can be helpful for those individuals who need full time care. 
 
What is the Next Step for My Teen with Oppositional Defiant Disorder?
 
If you have decided that outside intervention would be beneficial for your teen with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, you must then select a facility that is safe and experienced. Liahona Academy has specialized in helping teen boys with ODD overcome their challenges for almost 15 years. The supportive and consistent environment at Liahona Academy allows struggling teens to immerse themselves in the full time therapy they need in order to gain the skills to communicate effectively and repair their important relationships.
 
For a free consultation, contact us at Liahona Academy 1-800-675-8101.

What Do I Do With My Oppositional Defiant Disorder Teen?

Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is a condition which presents in approximately 6-10% of children before the age of 8. It is characterized by a persistent set of negative behaviors toward parents or other authority figure. Some of the symptoms of ODD are:
  • Arguing
  • Refusal to comply with basic requests 
  • Blaming others for mistakes 
  • Easily annoyed and deliberately annoys others
  • Anger and resentment
  • Violent reactions to frustration
 
Although many of these symptoms appear in every child at some point, those with ODD show a pattern of consistency with four or more for a period of six months or longer. Because Oppositional Defiant Disorder frequently co-exists with similar conditions or can be mistaken for mood disorders with similar symptoms, children with suspected ODD should be evaluated by a qualified mental health professional. Although early therapeutic intervention is the most effective way to deal with ODD, some kids do not get diagnosed until adolescence. As children with ODD reach adolescence, the characteristics that define the disorder begin to cause more harm as they become more and more unmanageable. One of the most prominent characteristics in kids with ODD is the persistent belief that they have been wronged, which enables the negative acting out. Violent reactions which were concerning in younger children may be dangerous in a teen and intimidating to those attempting to parent or manage them. 
 
Oppositional Defiant Disorder Treatment Options
 
Treating teens for Oppositional Defiant Disorder can be very challenging since the condition causes them to be resistant to any type of instruction or training. There are multiple options mental health professionals recommend to parents depending on the severity of the disorder as well as the level of parental involvement. Counseling, both individual and with the parents, can be helpful as teens learn to cope with daily triggers without aggression and parents learn more effective ways to handle their troubled child. Some teens may also benefit from social skill training, which teaches them how to interact with peers more positively. Although there is no pharmaceutical cure for ODD, some mental health professionals may prescribe medication that helps with the accompanying symptoms, such as depression or insomnia. There are cases, however, where a teen with ODD needs help beyond what his parents can provide in order to get his life back on track.
 
What is the Next Step for My Teen with Oppositional Defiant Disorder?
 
If you have determined that your teen with Oppositional Defiant Disorder could benefit from outside intervention, you must then select a facility that will address his unique challenges. Liahona Academy specializes in helping teen boys with ODD learn the skills they need in order to deal with daily challenges and communicate in an effective way. The intensive therapeutic environment at Liahona Academy allows struggling teens to receive full time care in order to rebuild important relationships and become successful adults.
 
For a free consultation, contact us at Liahona Academy 1-800-675-8101.

Reactive Attachment Disorder Infographic

Reactive-Attachment-Disorder-RAD-Infographic

 

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